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EkoBond Glue

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Posted: Tuesday, September 6, 2011 11:55 AM Quote
EkoBond is a very strong and versatile glue. It's important when attaching fabric to structure that you have a clean and dust free surface. There are no solvents in EkoBond to soften or damage the finish of the structure you're gluing to. Our STC does not require that you glue to structure. A 1" fabric to fabric glue joint is legal even over open bays or stringers. It's the fabric to fabric glue joint that's important. You're essentially gluing up a fabric envelope. No stitching of 2 large pieces of fabric together required with this system.

The goal when applying the bed layer of EkoBond to the surface is to have a film thickness great enough that when you press or iron the fabric into the bed layer of glue the weave of the fabric is actually becoming slightly encapsulated by the bed layer of glue. Heat does not "ACTIVATE" the glue it only softens it up a bit to allow the fabric to better penetrate the bed layer of glue.

When brushing glue down through the weave of the fabric the goal is to totally encapsulate the weave with glue. There is no need for excess glue on the top surface of the fabric. That is why it's very important to use the blue paper towels to remove the excess EkoBond from the surface of the fabric. Once you have saturated the paper towel with glue that particular area can no longer soak up any more glue so flip and wipe, flip and wipe, flip and wipe and throw away.
You should be looking for a full and even color saturation of the weave. If you see what looks like air pockets you should wait just a tiny bit longer for the glue to soak into the weave, OR brush harder to push the glue into the weave, OR slightly dilute the glue (up to 10%) with water to allow it to penetrate the weave better. A good time for using slightly diluted glue is when you get to applying finishing tapes.

Jason
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 8:39 AM Quote
I'm having a great time covering a junky stabalilzer. Now it's time for the fabric to come off. How do I dissolve the glue?
Also, although I clean the brushes right after I use them, a little glue always remains; is there a solvent that will allow me to clean the brushes? - Mike
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 7:28 AM Quote
jason gerard wrote:


The goal when applying the bed layer of EkoBond to the surface is to have a film thickness great enough that when you press or iron the fabric into the bed layer of glue the weave of the fabric is actually becoming slightly encapsulated by the bed layer of glue. Heat does not "ACTIVATE" the glue it only softens it up a bit to allow the fabric to better penetrate the bed layer of glue.

Jason


Does this mean that I can apply glue to fabric, allow it to dry for a day, iron a second piece of fabric over that glue, (softening the glue bed with an iron), then apply a topcoat of glue, wipe off excess and get an acceptable glue joint? - Mike
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 11:01 AM Quote
Does this mean that I can apply glue to fabric, allow it to dry for a day, iron a second piece of fabric over that glue, (softening the glue bed with an iron), then apply a topcoat of glue, wipe off excess and get an acceptable glue joint? - Mike

Yes, the bed layer of glue can be left over night on the fabric so when you come back in the morning you just need to heat clamp the second piece of fabric into that bed layer, brush a wet coat down through the fabric, and wipe off the excess.



I'm having a great time covering a junky stabalilzer. Now it's time for the fabric to come off. How do I dissolve the glue?
Also, although I clean the brushes right after I use them, a little glue always remains; is there a solvent that will allow me to clean the brushes? - Mike


I never clean brushes used for glueing. You will never get them clean enough. I haven't found a solvent yet that will dissolve dried EkoBond. Lacquer thinner, Acetone, MEK will soften the bond of the glue but they do not dissolve it. I just buy a box of cheap 1" brushes and always start the day off with a new one. When working with the EkoBond always keep your brush in the glue cup with a wet paper towel over it.

To remove the fabric just cut it off and use the eraser like we show in the manual to remove any glue residue on the structure. If you don't need to do anything other than install new fabric then you can just leave the tiny amount of residue on the structure, brush on a thin new coat of EkoBond and throw some new fabric on it. The EkoBond residue has to be sheared off the structure. You can soften the glue with a rag soaked in acetone.

Jason
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 9:08 AM Quote
Jason
Is the clear glue the same as the regular ecobond, just missing the color?
I checked the wrong box on the order form and now have a quart of it.
Bill
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 11:20 AM Quote
Regarding the "Linen" glue, yes it's the same but with a different color. We use the "Linen" EkoBond to mimic the old antique look of a cotton and dope covering job. It's primarily used on open cockpit biplanes where you don't have an interior to hide the back side of the fabric.

Use the Linen colored EkoBond to apply the fabric and tapes on the fuse. Then dilute the Linen EkoBond up to 10% with water and brush into the weave of the fabric. Do not leave any glue on the surface of the fabric you only want it in the weave. Then you would spray a x-coat of the white EKoFill to lock in the light tan color of the glue. Now you can spray 2-3 x-coats of grey EkoFill before top coating with EKoPoly

Doing this the fabric will have the proper appearance that a vintage aircraft should have when looking in the cockpit. The entire back side of the fabric will be a light tan instead of grey with green stripes everywhere a tape is.

Jason
Posted: Friday, November 11, 2011 10:22 AM Quote
I was covering my wings today and I decided to have a little fun and do a test on the glue since it seemed pretty darn strong to me.  So today I had some left over glue and some left over 2" Ceconite 102 pinked tapes.  I decided to do a 1" glue lap joint and then see how strong the glued lap joint is.  This glue joint was glued only 2 hours prior to the test so you can see how strong the joint nearly right after you glue it.

In order to have a straight pull on the tapes I sandwiched a full wrap around two pieces of 1 by 2 with 3 dry wall screws through the wood 1 of which went through the fabric.  I did this on both sides, and then clamped it to my house beam in my basement.  Turns out a 2" tape with a 1" lap joint makes a darn good pull up bar for a 148 lb person!  The popping noise you hear is the fabric slipping through the screws not the glue joint.  Pretty freaking strong stuff Eko bond is.  I know you can't see my feet off the ground but trust me I did several pull ups.

here is the video to prove it.  http://youtu.be/ov7_kgRjOqM

BTW I decided after I made the video to do some more pull ups on the fabric the test article eventually broke but it was only at the fabric near the wood sandwich.
Posted: Friday, November 11, 2011 12:57 PM Quote
That's a cool video,

Stewart Systems is the only certified covering system that does not require a sewn seam anywhere. A 1" fabric to fabric glue joint is approved even in an open bay. All testing was done with a 1" wide strip of fabric (measured with a caliper) and the FAA testing showed that even a 1/2" lap joint glue seam held every time. The fabric always broke first. 90 deg pull tests of a 1" wide strip showed to be 6lbs where the solvent based glues were 2lbs.

Jason
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 9:59 AM Quote
Jason, when you say "90 deg pull test" I'm assuming that to be in the peeling motion but pulling perpendicular to the lap joint sheer pull?
Posted: Sunday, November 13, 2011 3:57 AM Quote
Yes a 90 deg vertical pull or "peel" test.


Jason
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